Like a walk through the country side living on a small farm is full of daily surprises, sometimes wonderful and amazing, and other times puzzling and sad. I hope you will walk with me as I live out my dream of living on this tiny farm. You will come to know the dogs, cats, Shetland sheep and chickens that make up this farm and what goes into keeping them happy and healthy. Come and join the journey with me.

Sunday, June 21, 2009

I Had To Stand In Line...

....at the Mennonite bakery! I still can't get over it. What is wrong with people? Can't they do their own baking? Can't they stay at home? Or at least have the decency to get out and about later in the morning? Not only did I have to stand in line, but it was outside, snaking down the driveway, for Pete's sake. And I had to stand there for at least 15 minutes. I felt like I was at a Mart store.

Being traumatized from coming upon a thriving store line in the middle of no-where, I just stood in line and zoned out. Conversation swirled around me, and seemed to mostly revolve around allergies and other sicknesses the individuals were experiencing.

Really, all I wanted were two of their glazed donuts.

Once in the store, strict (made-up-by-those-in-line) policy was to turn to the left, and make a half circle around the room. The room which is only about 10 x 10 foot. Only about eight people could fit in comfortably. The honor code forbade jumping out of line and snatching that last package of cookies, or bread. It sure did smell good in there and was surprisingly cool. One lady cut in line before we even got in. However, she apologized profusely and explained she wasn't buying anything, and she sweared (swore?) she wouldn't mess up the line dynamics, but just wanted to see what it was like since her friends were in there. I get the idea she wasn't a local, and perhaps feared we would lynch her? I mean we might be hillbillies, but not Deliverance material even on our worst days. (Maybe this is where I should have said "sure go right ahead" and then started humming Dueling Banjos?)

While standing in line our entertainment was watching from across three fields, the distant figures of Mennonite girls 'picking something up'. Speculation was high--maybe picking up storm debris someone suggested. Hmm...or maybe they were weeding a garden? Again I got the distinct impression these folks were not locals.

So anyway, I may have boughten more than two donuts. Maybe a gooseberry pie (for my folks), maybe a loaf of bread, maybe a couple packages of cookies and stuff. Maybe.

Once I got away from there, my next stop was the veggie stand just down the road. I figured I'd really have to fight my way into that mess. Funnily enough there was only two other cars and they were leaving when I got there. Well, what does that say about us? Don't answer that, I think we all know what the response to that is. At the veggie stand I bought some tomatoes, squash, onions, lettuce and another loaf of wheat bread.

Gosh, it was getting hot. Onward to the little city, to pick up a few things. First though, I wanted to swing by the bulk food store over on the highway. Much to my deep, deep regret, the little bulk food store, once located near the bakery and veggie stands in the heart of the Mennonite settlement, has closed down. There is another bulk food store, ran by Mennonite's but it's closer to town, and these are 'transplanted' more modern Mennonite's from out of the area. It's a nice store, but very modern (without overhead gas lamps and a dark shadowy interior), and it's just not very thrilling to shop there. I did stock up on a few things...and...I bought me a chair! I'll feature my new chair later. I've been saving awhile for it.

In town I headed out to the vet's before they closed at noon, to pick up some Prevacoix for Ariel. It was a mad house there too. I had to wait for awhile, but I didn't mind. It's always entertaining to wait in a vet's office. The most amusing thing was when 'Rambo's' turn came up. Both vet's assistants came into the waiting room (one of which is seven days away from having her baby), and told Rambo he needed to be 'muzzled' up. They quickly fastened a blue muzzle over his snout and marched him off to exam room before he even knew what hit him. Oh, and Rambo was all of a twenty pound rat terrier! Sounds like he has a big reputation though. There was also a 'girl Boone' there, on the verge of whelping pups, it looked like. Gosh, she was ugly. (sorry Boone) She was much shorter than Boone, kinda squatty and her head didn't have much definition or expression. She was also a very pale tan color. She's probably everything a Dogue de Bordeaux should be, but Boone wins in my book any day! Of course I'm not biased or anything.

After that quick stop, it was off to the local 'mart store. Madhouse doesn't even cover it. What about this recession? What about people cutting back on their spending? Not having any money? Staying home 'cause gas is so high? Good grief. Doesn't anyone stay home anymore?

As you can probably tell, shopping and being around other shoppers is the highlight of my day. Not. At least I didn't run over anybody with my cart. Although I came this close, let me tell you. It's like, hello, do you have to squat there in the aisle with your butt covering both lanes and stare at that T-Shirt for twenty minutes? Do you? I only barely brushed against her with the cart, I swear. She never even flinched. Obviously she was a more advanced shopper than I.

Oh, I almost forgot, I also went by the Library book store and dumped off a nice big sack of books, and only came home with four books and magazine. I think that might be some kind of record for me. I definitely need a pat on the back for that.

Back on the home front it's 84 degrees, 'feels like' 91 and the humidity is at a whopping 70 percent. I wimped out. The air conditioner is on, and I've got the back curtained off. The temp has dropped to about 80 here in the back and with the fans and air conditioning on it's very comfortable. I brought the dogs in and they are very happy to be stretched out on the cool floor. The sheep and chickens aren't so lucky, and are laying low in any shady spot they can find.

At some point I'll have to pry myself out of my little ice house, but not until this evening.

Have a great week.

8 comments:

Nancy K. said...

What a wonderful day (and POST!).
Although, I must admit, I'd be happy if I never had to leave home...

Thanks for the chuckles!

Vicki Lane said...

One of the very best things about not having a regular day job is NEVER going shopping on the weekend. EVER!

And good for you, leaving more books at the library than you brought away! I'll have to see if I can do that sometime.

Star said...

I had to ask L what a Mennonite was! excuse my ignorance. I know the Amish and I love their clothes, houses, animals, carts etc. I spose the Mennonites are the same and their shops probably look very old fashioned, in a gorgeous sort of way. Like you, I hate it when a shop I like closes down. That has happened a lot lately, sad to say.
Blessings, Star

~Tonia said...

It was probably because of Hillbilly days going on. There are a lot of tourist that come in for that. I have been in there and had very little to choose from! Its a shame that other bulk store closed. I wonder if the new one out on the highway affected it? I love to visit the greenhouse/vegetable stand they are so nice!!
I didnt go to town much this weekend they said it was crazy though. I drove through on my way to the other house and was glad to get out of there!!

Kathy said...

ROTFLMAO!!!!!

It sounds like Flagstaff at the first of the month when all the NA come in off the reservations to shop - even tho they have the same store closer to where they live! You could swap "mennonite" for "mormon" here. It'd be the same shopping trip. :)

Michelle at Boulderneigh said...

I'm patting your back as vigorously as I can through the screen; GOOD JOB on a net reduction of books! Glad to be here where it's delightfully cool but sunny, instead of there with the heat and humidity. You can come crash here anytime.... :-)

A.M. said...

I am so inspired by your blog and homestead -- I found it while searching for ways to fund a homestead or minifarm coop. I am taking a course at UCLA to learn how to write proposals to foundations, but finding the right niche is taking a lot of time. Can you tell us of sources for funding to purchase "bricks and mortar" items such as land and buildings as well as edible landscaping, tools, hydroponic or french intensive garden supplies, greenhouses, trestle tables, etc? We don't want to take out loans, we would like to establish a non-profit foundation and have a number of eligibility statuses. We can make it a wellness coop, so it falls under the health and helping the disabled category. Or an educational group. Or a sustainable ecological village sort of thing.

Any clues would be greatly appreciated!

A.M. said...

I am so inspired by your blog and homestead -- I found it while searching for ways to fund a homestead or minifarm coop. I am taking a course at UCLA to learn how to write proposals to foundations, but finding the right niche is taking a lot of time. Can you tell us of sources for funding to purchase "bricks and mortar" items such as land and buildings as well as edible landscaping, tools, hydroponic or french intensive garden supplies, greenhouses, trestle tables, etc? We don't want to take out loans, we would like to establish a non-profit foundation and have a number of eligibility statuses. We can make it a wellness coop, so it falls under the health and helping the disabled category. Or an educational group. Or a sustainable ecological village sort of thing.

Any clues would be greatly appreciated!